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The Daily Dish: November 25, 2015

The Daily Dish: November 25, 2015


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Dishing out the latest and greatest in food news

Learn more about what is hot and trending in the world of food and drink.

Today’s first course?

Ahead of Thanksgiving Day tomorrow comes a reminder from safety experts regarding a dangerous trend that results in trips to the emergency room each year — after folks attempt to deep fry their turkey. While fried turkey is still popular, officials with the National Fire Protection Association say, "Turkey fryers that use cooking oil are not suitable for safe use by even a well-informed and careful consumer.” If you insist on deep frying your turkey for tomorrow, we have some helpful tips on how to do it safely, on The Daily Meal.com.

If you’re a fan of fast food chain Tim Hortons, you may not like this next story. Leaders with the restaurant have closed almost two dozen locations in the Northeastern U.S. with, get this, little to no notice. 15 stores were closed in New York, while six stores were closed in Maine. In fact, at least one store closed with such little warning that customers were dining in at the time and were told to leave! Store leaders say the decision to close the locations was related to performance.

Leaders with Nestlé have confirmed suspicions of slave labor practices in its seafood supply chain. Now, instead of waiting for rumors to turn into scandalous facts, the company’s attempting to get in front of the story. It has hired an independent nonprofit research team to investigate claims that fisherman from Thailand, Burma, and Cambodia, who catch the seafood used in Nestlé’s Purina Fancy Feast cat food, have been severely mistreated and are subject to slave-like labor practices. Nestlé has promised to publish the findings of the reports and update their labor practices to make sure workers are treated fairly.

That’s today’s Daily Dish, thanks for watching. Stop back tomorrow for another helping.


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


Easy Canning Recipe: Corn Cob Jelly

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and incredibly delicate and delicious. It tastes a whole lot like honey on anything you spread it on.

Saving Summer is my the theme for today and it’s something that’s pretty near and dear to my heart.

My garden is constantly over flowing with fruits and veggies that I can’t use up fast enough.

Last year we had an over abundance of banana peppers and blueberries.

This year it has been strawberries, blueberries and corn. Yes, corn.

Welcome to my world. I live in Missouri and it’s pretty abundant here.

I actually remember the first time I told someone in Florida, that I actually grow corn in my garden.

She laughed and laughed. I guess that does seem kinda strange to someone from Florida but here it’s a household staple.

It’s everywhere. You don’t even have to go far from my house to find corn field after corn field.

No really. Less than 5 minutes.

Since I have such an abundance of corn this year, I thought it only fitting to make that the subject for today.

This delicious Corn Cob Jelly is light, sweet and tastes a whole lot like honey.

I got this recipe from my blogging friend Pam from Blueberries and Blessings (blog is gone now) and set about making it nearly immediately.

I cannot tell you how happy I am we tried it and we’ve made it a bunch since!

The first time we tried making Corn Cob Jelly, it never did firm up all the way.

At first, I was disappointed but then realized it had turned into a delicious, thick syrup for waffles and pancakes.

Okay, that works, I guess. But not what I wanted.

It was delicious, but it definitely lacked the jelly consistency that I was looking for.

At least I now know how to make Corn Cob Syrup and yes I have made a few batches.

Since what I wanted was Jelly, I was determined to get some Corn Cob Jelly this year.

So I tweaked the recipe, mixing it with a few others after doing some research.

It all related to the sugar amount.

The less sugar I used, the more syrupy my liquid would be, and no amount of letting it sit in the fridge or anywhere was changing that.

The balance seems to be the amount of cups of water should equal the amount of cups of sugar added.

That seems to work pretty well.

I seem to get about 3 1/2 cups of liquid after straining each time I make this, so that’s what I used in sugar.

This held true whether I used regular fruit pectin or it’s low sugar counterpart.

So use whichever you prefer.

While I certainly have an over abundance of corn growing, it isn’t generally ready all at the same time.

So, my other trick is to freeze the corn cobs after removing the kernels for other uses.

I might only pull 2 or 3 a day, so I pop them in a freezer bag after I’ve removed the kernels.

When I am ready to whip up a batch of Corn Cob Jelly, I just allow a little more time when I am boiling to let the flavor into the water.

I’ve had no problems doing this, so if you’re like me and don’t typically have 12 corn cobs all at the same time, freezing works.

Oh and one more fun little trick.

When I remove the corn cobs from the water, I allow them to dry out completely.

They make AWESOME fire starters for those fall campfires or fire pits.

Well, either that or you can share it with any small rodents you have living in your house.

The Corn Cob Jelly is excellent on:

  • toast
  • English muffins
  • toast
  • pancakes
  • waffles
  • pork chops
  • steaks
  • anywhere you would add jelly or even honey

Have you ever made or tried Corn Cob Jelly? You really must!


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